Listen (Earthen Witch Novel #3) by Sarah Doughty

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Description:

When vampires Liam and Jon go missing, it’s up to Aisling Green and her friends to find them, but doing so and surviving what awaits won’t be easy.

Battling against things she cannot fight isn’t something Earthen witch Aisling Green is used to, but she must act quickly and outsmart the one that wants her dead and save the lives of her friends before it’s too late.

As they follow the trail, they rescue a most unlikely person, and uncover a deeper, more sinister plot. With the lives of the two vampires on the line, they must fight for their lives, try to rescue their friends, and stop the evil plans. In the face of so much danger and uncertainty, they are forced to go to war and make a discovery that will change everything. The question then becomes at what price will they be forced to pay to survive?

*****

Listen is the third book in the Earthen Witch Series by Sarah Doughty. At first I was a little nervous to plunge into a series without reading the previous novels, normally, I would like to read the series in sequence, but Sarah Doughty did a wonderful job of providing ample backstory for the details of the novel to make sense, while still leaving enough unsaid to want to go back and read the previous novels.

The story follows Earthen Witch, Aisling Green and her band of companions as they attempt to save some their own from the clutches of the Voodoo Queen of New Orleans. The story is fast-paced and full of action. There were lots of fun and interesting characters in the book, everything from vampires to ghouls, sphinxes to pixies, and even an appearance from a well-known literary character that I found both clever and intriguing.  The Earthen Witch world is a vivid and rich one. I enjoyed learning about the powers and abilities of the characters and the ways they interacted with each other. Sarah’s writing style was easy to follow and the description was enough to set the scene without burdening the reader with unneeded detail.

If you enjoy books like Charlaine Harris’ Sookie Stackhouse Series you will love the Earthen Witch Series, but do keep in mind that this series isn’t targeted at the YA audience and contains more adult themes.

You can find more information about Sarah and her books at these links.
Smashwords Profile
Goodreads
Website/Blog

Reading Recommendations – YA Series

There are four series of books that come to mind when I think of authors who have influenced my desire to be a writer.

The Twilight Saga – Stephenie Meyer

twilight-seriesThe Twilight Saga gave me back something that I lost for a few years, my love of reading. I watched the movie first, and even though I love them now because they stem from the books, back then, I wondered what all the fuss was about. I couldn’t see the attraction that many people claimed the books had, so I decided I needed to go to the source and read the book for myself. I sat up until 4:00am that first night. There was something about Bella and Edward’s young love that took me back to the time I was young and fresh and innocent. I came to the series late, so the next day when I went back to the store, I was able to buy the rest of the books in the series. I devoured them. I gave them to my friends, who looked at me a little dubiously, but called me later, cursing me for their lack of sleep. So Twilight brought back my love of reading, which, in turn, brought me to begin writing.

The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins

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As a reader, I never took much notice of writing styles. A good book was a good book. I didn’t know what attracted me to the story, just that I liked it. I read without noticing the manner in which a story was told. Past tense, present tense, first person, third person, sentence structure and flow meant nothing to me, but Hunger Games changed this. Suzanne Collin’s wrote with a simplicity that kept me spellbound, and I had to find out why. It was a difficult one to recommend, though. Most conversations went something like this.
“I’ve just finished this great book. You should read it.”
“What’s it called?”
“The Hunger Games. It’s brilliant.”
“So, what’s it about?”
Here, I would usually pause and try to think of the easiest way of saying it without it sounding so brutal. But there was no other way to put it. “Ah, it’s about these kids killing each other in a reality TV-style show, ordered by a sadistic futuristic government.” At the dubious looks that statement received, I would usually add, “Just read it. Trust me.”

Gone Series – Michael Grant

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The Gone Series by Michael Grant is a little easier to recommend than the Hunger Games, though possibly more gruesome. It’s about a town where all the kids, fifteen and under, suddenly find themselves alone, cut off from the rest of the world by a giant dome. No adults. No supervision. No idea of what happened to the older members of their families. And then they start to develop powers. Some of them use these powers for good. Others do not. It can get rather brutal at times, but the characters and story development kept me glued.

The Raven Cycle – Maggie Stiefvater

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I have just received my copy of the last book in this series. I’m waiting for someone to offer to take over my life for an entire day so I can put everything aside and dedicate myself to delving into this delicious book, but I don’t see it happening. And by delicious, I really do mean delicious. Maggie’s use of words is magical. There is no other way to put it. I first came to love her for The Scorpio Races, but the Raven Cycle series is even better. Probably because there is more; four books, instead of one.
So there you have it. My YA series reading recommendations, well, the ones that influenced me the most, anyway.

Have you read them?
Let me know what your thoughts are in the comments below.
What are your YA series recommendations?

 

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